Corruption

Federal politicians convicted of crimes in Lawless America

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Many politicians have been convicted of crimes in Lawless America.

It's sad, but what is really sad is that soooo many others commit crimes and get away with it...




This list consists of American politicians convicted of crimes either committed or prosecuted while holding office in the federal government.  It includes politicians who were convicted or pleaded guilty in a court of law; and does not include politicians involved in unprosecuted scandals (which may or may not have been illegal in nature), or politicians who have only been arrested or indicted.  The list also does not include crimes which occur outside the politician’s tenure unless they specifically stem from acts while they were in office.

Although the convicted politicians are arranged by presidential terms starting with the most recent, many of the crimes have little or no connection to who is President....

2017–2017 (Trump (R) presidency)

Legislative branch

2009–2017 (Obama (D) presidency)

Executive branch

Legislative branch

Judicial branch

2001–2009 (George W. Bush (R) presidency)

Executive branch

Legislative branch

  1. Bob Ney (R-OH) pleaded guilty to conspiracy and making false statements as a result of his receiving trips from Abramoff in exchange for legislative favors. Ney received 30 months in prison. (2007)[36]

1993–2001 (Clinton (D) presidency)

Executive branch

Legislative branch

  1. Buz Lukens (R-Ohio) convicted of bribery and conspiracy.[55]
  2. Carl C. Perkins (D-Kentucky) pleaded guilty to a check kiting scheme involving several financial institutions (including the House Bank).[56]
  3. Carroll Hubbard (D-Kentucky) was convicted of illegally funneling money to his wife's 1992 campaign to succeed him in congress.[57]
  4. Mary Rose Oakar (D-Ohio) pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor campaign finance charge not related to the House Bank.[58]
  5. Walter Fauntroy (D-District of Columbia) was convicted of filing false disclosure forms to hide unauthorized income.[59]
  1. Dan Rostenkowski (D-IL) was convicted and sentenced to 18 months in prison, in 1995.[61]
  2. Joe Kolter (D-Pennsylvania) pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy and sentenced to 6 months in prison.(1996)[62][63]

1989–1993 (George H. W. Bush (R) presidency)

Executive branch

Legislative branch

1981–1989 (Reagan (R) presidency)

Executive branch

See also: Reagan administration scandals

  1. Melvyn Paisley, Assistant Secretary of the Navy,[73] was found to have accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes. He pleaded guilty to bribery and served four years in prison.[74][75][76]
  2. James E. Gaines, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy, took over when Paisley resigned his office.[77] Gaines was convicted of accepting an illegal gratuity and theft and conversion of government property. He was sentenced to six months in prison.[78]
  3. Victor D. Cohen, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force, was the 50th conviction obtained under the Ill Wind probe when he pleaded guilty to accepting bribes and conspiring to defraud the government. He was sentenced to 33 months in prison.[79][80]
  1. James G. Watt (R) United States Secretary of the Interior 1981–1983, was charged with 25 counts of perjury and obstruction of justice. Sentenced to five years probation, fined $5,000 and 500 hours of community service[82]
  1. Elliott Abrams (R) Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs, convicted of withholding evidence. Given 2 years probation. Later pardoned by President George H. W. Bush.[84]

Legislative branch

  1. Harrison A. Williams (D-NJ) Convicted on 9 counts of bribery and conspiracy. Sentenced to 3 years in prison.[87]
  2. John Jenrette (D-SC) sentenced to two years in prison for bribery and conspiracy.[88]
  3. Richard Kelly (R-FL) Accepted $25K and then claimed he was conducting his own investigation into corruption. Served 13 months.[89]
  4. Raymond Lederer (D-PA) "I can give you me" he said after accepting $50K. Sentenced to 3 years.[90]
  5. Michael Myers (D-PA) Accepted $50K saying, "...money talks and bullshit walks." Sentenced to 3 years and was expelled from the House.[91]
  6. Frank Thompson (D-NJ) Sentenced to 3 years.[92]
  7. John M. Murphy (D-NY) Served 20 months of a 3-year sentence.[93]
  1. Mario Biaggi (D-NY) Convicted of obstruction of justice and accepting illegal gratuities he was sentenced to 2½ years in prison and fined $500K. (1987)[95]
  2. Robert Garcia (D-NY) sentenced to 2½ years.[96]

1977–1981 (Carter (D) presidency)

Legislative branch

1974–1977 (Ford (R) presidency)

Executive branch

Legislative branch

1969–1974 (Nixon (R) presidency)

Executive branch

  1. John N. Mitchell (R) former United States Attorney General, convicted of perjury.[120]
  2. Richard Kleindienst (R) United States Attorney General, convicted of "refusing to answer questions" given one month in jail.
  3. H. R. Haldeman (R) White House Chief of Staff, convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury. Served 18 months in prison.
  4. John Ehrlichman (R) former White House Counsel, convicted of conspiracy, obstruction of justice, and perjury. Served 18 months in prison.
  5. Egil Krogh (R) United States Undersecretary of Transportation, sentenced to six months.
  6. John Dean (R) White House Counsel, convicted of obstruction of justice, later reduced to felony offenses and served 4 months.
  7. Dwight Chapin (R) Secretary to the President of the United States, convicted of perjury.
  8. Charles Colson (R) Special Counsel to the President for Public Liaison, convicted of obstruction of justice. Served 7 months.

Legislative branch

1963–1969 (Lyndon B. Johnson (D) presidency)

Legislative branch

1961–1963 (Kennedy (D) presidency)

Legislative branch

1953–1961 (Eisenhower (R) presidency)

Legislative branch

1945–1953 (Truman (D) presidency)

Legislative branch

1933–1945 (Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) presidency)

Legislative branch

1929-1933 (Hoover (R) presidency)

Legislative Branch

1923–1929 (Coolidge (R) presidency)

Legislative branch

1921–1923 (Harding (R) presidency)

Executive branch

The Harding administration was marred by scandals stemming from his appointment of men in his administration whom he had known in Ohio. They came to be known as the Ohio Gang. They include;

  1. Albert Fall (R) Secretary of the Interior who was bribed by Harry F. Sinclair for control of the Teapot Dome federal oil reserves in Wyoming. He was the first U.S. cabinet member to ever be convicted; he served two years in prison. (1922) [144]

1909-1921 (Taft (R) and Wilson (D))

<No criminal convictions of American federal politicians found by contributors to this article for this period>

1901-1909 (Theodore Roosevelt (R) presidency)

Legislative Branch

1897-1901 (McKinley (R) presidency)

Executive Branch

1777–1897

Judges

 Information courtesy of Wikipedia

William M. Windsor

I, William M. Windsor, am not an attorney.  This website expresses my OPINIONS.   The comments of visitors or guest authors to the website are their opinions and do not therefore reflect my opinions.  Anyone mentioned by name in any article is welcome to file a response.   This website does not provide legal advice.  I do not give legal advice.  I do not practice law.  This website is to expose government corruption, law enforcement corruption, political corruption, and judicial corruption.   Whatever this website says about the law is presented in the context of how I or others perceive the applicability of the law to a set of circumstances if I (or some other author) was in the circumstances under the conditions discussed.  Despite my concerns about lawyers in general, I suggest that anyone with legal questions consult an attorney for an answer, particularly after reading anything on this website.  The law is a gray area at best.  Please read our Legal Notice and Terms

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