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Gilley, Ronald E.

Accused Party Type
Business
Accused Party Title
Owner
Court or Office
Country Crossing
Accused City
Enterprise
Accused County
Houston
Accused State
Alabama
County of Complaint
Houston
State of Complaint
Date of Complaint
22/04/2011
Rating of the Accused Party
0
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An Alabama businessman pleaded guilty today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Wallace Capel Jr. to his role in conspiring to bribe legislators in exchange for their favorable votes on pro-gambling legislation, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division and Special Agent in Charge Lewis M. Chapman of the FBI’s Mobile Field Office.

Ronald E. Gilley, 46, of Enterprise, Ala., pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama to one count of conspiracy to commit federal program bribery, six counts of federal program bribery and four counts of money laundering. Gilley and 10 co-defendants were charged in a 39-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury on Oct. 1, 2010, with a variety of criminal offenses for their alleged roles in the bribery scheme. Jarrod Massey, 39, of Montgomery, Ala., a lobbyist for Gilley, pleaded guilty on Dec. 20, 2010, for his role in the conspiracy. His sentencing is scheduled for Nov. 15, 2011. The remaining nine defendants include two current Alabama state legislators, two former Alabama state legislators, two lobbyists, one business owner, an employee of Gilley and an employee of the Alabama legislature.

“Ronald Gilley thought votes could be bought and sold in Alabama,” said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. “He participated in an audacious scheme to bribe state legislators into supporting a law that would fatten his wallet. But he, like his co-conspirators, was stopped in his tracks. Now, Mr. Gilley must face the consequences of his corruption.”

“Mr. Gilley’s plea demonstrates the FBI’s commitment to investigate violations of the public’s trust,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Chapman. “His plea should further serve as a way to repair the public’s trust in local officials and demonstrates how people can and will be held accountable for their actions.” Chapman also stated, “The public is encouraged to continue to disclose information regarding corrupt activities by persons in positions of trust to the FBI. Investigations involving violations of the public’s trust represents one of the highest priorities of the FBI. ”

According to information contained in court documents and presented during the plea hearing, Gilley owned a controlling interest in Country Crossing, an entertainment and gambling development in Houston County, Ala., which also sought to offer electronic bingo gambling machines to the public. Milton E. McGregor owned a controlling interest in Macon County Greyhound Park Inc., also known as Victoryland, in Macon County, Ala., and Jefferson County Racing Association in Jefferson County, Ala. He also had an ownership interest in other entertainment and gambling facilities in Alabama, including Country Crossing, which offered or sought to offer electronic bingo gambling machines to the public.

According to court documents, during the 2009 and 2010 Alabama state legislative sessions, Gilley and McGregor, along with others, allegedly promoted the passage of pro-gambling legislation that would have been favorable to the business interests of individuals operating electronic bingo facilities in Alabama, including themselves.

Gilley admitted, among other things, his involvement in offering things of value worth millions of dollars to members of the Alabama legislature, in exchange for legislators’ votes. Gilley also admitted directing lobbyists who worked for him, including Massey and Jennifer D. Pouncy, to offer legislators bribes for their votes. Pouncy, 34, of Montgomery, Ala., pleaded guilty on Sept. 28, 2010, for her role in the bribery conspiracy, and is scheduled to be sentenced on Aug. 11, 2011.

According to court documents, Gilley and others attempted to conceal the true nature, source and control of the payments made to members of the Alabama legislature in return for their favorable votes by, among other ways, engaging in financial transactions and disguising illicit payments through political action committees and using conduit contributors.

Gilley faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine on the conspiracy charge. Each count of federal program bribery carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Each count of money laundering carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $500,000 fine. In connection with the money laundering charges, Gilley agreed to forfeit $200,000. A sentencing date has not been set.

Trial for the remaining nine defendants is scheduled to begin on June 6, 2011, before U.S. District Judge Myron H. Thompson. The defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

The case is being prosecuted by Deputy Chief Justin V. Shur, Trial Attorneys Edward T. Kang, Eric G. Olshan, Barak Cohen and E. Rae Woods of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section; Senior Litigation Counsel Brenda K. Morris of the Criminal Division; and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Louis V. Franklin and Steve P. Feaga of the Middle District of Alabama. The case is being supervised by the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section and is being investigated by the FBI.

***

October 4, 2010:

Alabama Legislators, Staff Member, Lobbyists and Businessmen Charged in 39-count Indictment for Roles in Wide-ranging Conspiracy to Influence and Corrupt Votes Related to Electronic Bingo Legislation
Former Lobbyist Pleads Guilty for Her Role in Scheme

Eleven individuals, including four current Alabama state legislators, three lobbyists, two business owners and one of their employees, and an employee of the Alabama legislature have been charged for their roles in a conspiracy to offer to and to bribe legislators for their votes and influence on proposed legislation, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division and Assistant Director Kevin Perkins of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division.

The defendants are charged in an indictment returned by a grand jury on Oct. 1, 2010, in Montgomery, Ala., which was unsealed today. Various defendants are charged with a variety of criminal offenses, including conspiracy, federal program bribery, extortion, money laundering, honest services mail and wire fraud, obstruction of justice and making a false statement. They will make initial appearances today in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Alabama before U.S. Magistrate Judge Terry F. Moorer.

"Today, charges were unsealed against 11 legislators, businessmen, lobbyists and associates who, together, are alleged to have formed a corrupt network whose aim was to buy and sell votes in the Alabama legislature in order to directly benefit the business interests of two defendants, Milton McGregor and Ronald Gilley," said Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division. "The people of Alabama, like all our citizens, deserve to have representatives who act in the public’s interest, not for their own personal financial gain. Vote-buying, like the kind alleged in this indictment, corrodes the public’s faith in our democratic institutions and cannot go unpunished."

"The allegations in today’s indictment underscore the commitment of the FBI, the Department of Justice, and the Alabama Bureau of Investigation to continue to pursue those in public office who undermine the public’s trust and engage in unethical and corrupt practices," said Assistant Director Kevin Perkins of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division.

According to the indictment, Milton E. McGregor owned a controlling interest in Macon County Greyhound Park Inc., also known as Victoryland, in Macon County, Ala., and Jefferson Country Racing Association in Jefferson County, Ala., as well as ownership interest in other entertainment and gambling facilities in Alabama that offered or sought to offer electronic bingo gambling machines to the public. Ronald E. Gilley owned a controlling interest in the Country Crossing real estate, entertainment and gambling development in Houston County, Ala., which also sought to offer electronic bingo gambling machines to the public.

During the 2009 and 2010 Alabama state legislative sessions, McGregor and Gilley, along with others, allegedly promoted the passage of pro-gambling legislation that would have been favorable to the business interest of individuals operating electronic bingo facilities, including themselves. From February 2009 through August 2010, McGregor, Gilley and their co-defendants allegedly conspired to commit federal program bribery by corruptly giving, offering and agreeing to give money and other things of value to Alabama state legislators and staff with the intent to influence and reward them in connection with pro-gambling legislation. The indictment alleges that Alabama state legislators, including co-defendants State Senator Larry P. Means, State Senator James E. Preuitt, State Senator Quinton T. Ross Jr., and Senator Harri Anne H. Smith corruptly solicited, demanded, accepted and agreed to accept money and things of value from their co-conspirators and others, intending to be influenced and rewarded in connection with pro-gambling legislation.

Specifically, the indictment alleges that Gilley, his primary lobbyist, Jarrod D. Massey, and State Senator Smith, sought to bribe a member of the Alabama House of Representatives during the 2009 legislative session, promising hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign support in exchange for the legislator’s favorable vote on pro-gambling legislation. Similarly, in 2010, McGregor, Gilley and Massey allegedly sought to bribe a member of the Alabama Senate, offering the legislator $1 million, to use at the legislator’s discretion, funneled through a public relations job. According to the indictment, McGregor, along with lobbyist Robert B. Geddie Jr., also provided a $5,000 campaign contribution to a member of the Alabama House of Representatives in exchange for his vote on pro-gambling legislation during the 2010 legislative session.

The indictment also alleges that State Senator Means, who had abstained from an earlier vote on the pro-gambling legislation in 2010, solicited bribes from McGregor, Gilley, Massey and others, and, in one specific instance, sought $100,000 in return for voting in favor of the legislation. According to the indictment, McGregor, his lobbyist Thomas E. Coker, Gilley, Massey, Gilley’s employee Jarrell W. Walker Jr., and others allegedly bribed State Senator Preuitt, who had voted no in the earlier vote on the legislation, promising $2 million in campaign contributions and the use of country music stars in Preuitt’s reelection campaign, among other things of value in exchange for his vote in favor of the pro-gambling legislation. Gilley, Massey, Walker and others also allegedly discussed purchasing a large number of vehicles from Preuitt’s auto dealership in exchange for Preuitt’s vote.

State Senator Ross also is alleged to have solicited significant campaign contributions from McGregor, Gilley, Massey and others. According to the indictment, Ross allegedly pressured McGregor for campaign contributions the day before and the day of the vote on the pro-gambling legislation. In addition, State Senator Smith, who previously introduced an anti-gambling bill during the 2008 legislative session, voted in favor of the pro-gambling legislation in 2010 and allegedly lobbied other legislators to support the legislation in exchange for promises and payments of hundreds of thousands of dollars from Gilley and others. The indictment also alleges that Joseph R. Crosby, an employee of the Alabama Legislative Reference Service who received $3,000 per month from McGregor, took official action on behalf of McGregor, including making changes to the pro-gambling legislation that would benefit McGregor.

In a related case, Jennifer D. Pouncy, 34, of Montgomery, Ala., pleaded guilty on Sept. 28, 2010, before U.S. Magistrate Judge Charles S. Coody to one count of conspiracy for her role in the scheme. According to information stated during her plea hearing, Pouncy admitted that she offered State Senator Preuitt $2 million for his vote on the pro-gambling legislation, based on orders from Massey. Pouncy also admitted that Massey and Gilley authorized her to offer $100,000 to State Senator Means in return for his support for the pro-gambling legislation. Pouncy’s guilty plea was unsealed this morning, and a sentencing date has not been set.

The defendants named in the indictment unsealed today were charged with the following crimes:

Milton E. McGregor, 71, of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, six counts of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud;
Ronald E. Gilley, 45, of Enterprise, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, six counts of federal program bribery, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and four counts of money laundering;
Jarrod D. Massey, 39, of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, five counts of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud;
Thomas E. Coker, 70, of Lowndesboro, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud;
Robert B. Geddie Jr., 60, of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and one count of obstruction of justice;
Jarrell W. Walker Jr., 36, of Lanett, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud;
Harri Anne H. Smith, 48, of Slocomb, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, one count of extortion, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and four counts of money laundering;
Larry P. Means, 63, of Attalla, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, two counts of attempted extortion, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud;
James E. Preuitt, 75, of Talladega, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, one count of attempted extortion, 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud, and one count of making a false statement;
Quinton T. Ross Jr., 41, of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, two counts of federal program bribery, two counts of attempted extortion, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud; and
Joseph R. Crosby, 61, of Montgomery, Ala., was charged with one count of conspiracy, one count of federal program bribery, and 11 counts of honest services mail and wire fraud.

The conspiracy charge carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The federal program bribery charges carry a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Each count of extortion, honest services mail and wire fraud, money laundering and obstruction of justice carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The false statement charge carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The indictment also contains a notice of forfeiture as to defendants Smith and Gilley.

An indictment is merely an allegation and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

The case is being prosecuted by Senior Deputy Chief Peter J. Ainsworth and Trial Attorneys Eric G. Olshan, Barak Cohen and E. Rae Woods of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section; Senior Litigation Counsel Brenda K. Morris of the Criminal Division; and Assistant U.S. Attorneys Louis V. Franklin and Steve P. Feaga of the Middle District of Alabama. The case is being supervised by the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section, and is being investigated by the FBI’s Montgomery Field Office.

Judges

Judicial Corruption is rampant.  Our rights to a fair trial are a myth.  Many judges are totally corrupt.

Constitution

Our fundamental rights have been taken away by a government of wrongs. Stolen by corruption.

Attorneys

Misconduct is everywhere. Dishonesty abounds. Perjury, subornation of perjury, corruption!

Police

Abuse, Dishonesty, Corruption.  It's all common with Police and Law Enforcement.

Government

Government Dishonesty is Bad.
We must find honest people
and make them accountable
to We the People.
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